Alternative Treatments For Alzheimer

Like most diseases, those who have Alzheimer’s or those who are family members or close friends of those who have Alzheimer’s disease may be looking towards alternative treatments in hopes of bring relief or to prolong quality of life to those who suffer from the disease. Alternative treatments may involve herbal remedies, and dietary supplements and others.

A patient or the patient’s family should always discuss alternative treatments with the doctor caring for the individual with Alzheimer’s when the treatment plan is being devised or modified. Alzheimer’s is a complicated disease with no two individuals going through the course of the disease with the exact same symptoms or in the exact same intensity or progression. Many factors should be taken into consideration when designing and implementing a treatment plan. Most treatment plans for those with Alzheimer’s involve a combination of medicated and non-medicated methods. Patients or other concerned individuals should, for the safety of the individual with Alzheimer’s seek competent medical resources when investigating alternative methods of treating Alzheimer’s and consult with the main doctor treating the specific patient before making any changes in the treatment of that individual to prevent side effects or adverse reactions from other elements of the treatment plan with any new alternative treatment.

It is important to investigate any source of herbal or supplemental remedy for quality and respectability of the manufacturer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not do the same rigorous scientific research on these herbal or supplemental remedies as it does on prescription medications therefore it is up to the consumer to make sure that they do adequate amounts of research to validate the claims made by companies selling herbal or supplemental remedies.

Some alternative treatments may have some benefit but they may also cause legitimate concerns regarding effectiveness and safety. When combining alternative remedies with traditional treatments both medicated and non-medicated; it is important to keep in mind the need for not only the effectiveness and safety of such herbal and supplemental remedies but purity, and adverse reactions.

Coenzyme Q10 is one supplement that has been linked with Alzheimer’s disease. It is an antioxidant that normally occurs in the body and the body uses it for normal cell reactions. There are no current adequate studies regarding Coenzyme Q10 and its effectiveness for its use in treating those with Alzheimer’s disease.

Coral calcium is a supplement that has been given much publicity regarding being a “cure for Alzheimer’s disease” and other diseases. In 2003, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) filed complaints against those who distribute and promote Coral Calcium as a “cure for Alzheimer’s” because they believed there were no documented support or evidence of the health claims being made by these companies. It is important that anyone taking any herbal or supplements make sure that the companies they are dealing with are reputable.

Ginkgo biloba is a plant extract that possibly contains an antioxidant and an anti-inflammatory property that may protect cell membranes and also may regulate neurotransmitter function that may have a positive effect on memory. There was one study done and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1997 that shows modest improvement in the cognitive function of study participants regarding daily living tasks and social behavior but found no overall difference in overall impairment. Further research was determined to be needed. Other studies of Ginkgo biloba are currently being conducted.

One Response to “Alternative Treatments For Alzheimer”

  1. Del Capestro says:

    There is no coherent, consistent and widely accepted definition of alternative medicine. Often referred to as complementary and alternative medicine, or simply as CAM,alternative medicine resists easy definition because the health systems and practices to which it refers are diffuse and its boundaries are poorly defined.

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